FO Friday: The Fibonacci Pullover

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The Fibonacci Pullover is the first step I have taken into designing my own knitwear.  Elizabeth Zimmermann’s Brook’s Classic Pullover pattern from The Opinionated Knitter was an excellent place to start because it gave me the experience of measuring a body and creating a sweater from the gauge I got out of those measurements.  Also, being plain stockinette stitch, it leaves room for cables and modifications.

I took on the challenge of designing a cable that would work with the Fibonacci sequence of numbers, and to make it a larger cable, used the value of 8 as the base number.  The cable turned out rather well, and was easy and enjoyable to knit.

Classic Brooks Sweater - The Fibonacci Pullover

I decided to place the cable in the front of the sweater where it’s beginning synchronistically lines up with the heart centre of the his chest. This cable was a little bit longer, but not long enough to include a complete amount of purl stitches for the next number in the sequence. So, I decided to continue purling all the way around his neck line, giving the rolled hem a place to rest and finishing the number in the sequence at the same time.  Then, I decided to balance the sweater by doing one slightly shorter cable on the outside of each arm.  The hubster is eager to greet the person who recognizes the symbolism of the cables on his sweater.

Classic Brooks Sweater - The Fibonacci Pullover

The shoulder decreases didn’t work when I tried to do the right under the shoulder bones.  I ended up with a bunch of extra fabric, like little wings.  So, I ripped it back and did the decreases starting three inches above armpit instead of two, and right over the armpits.  Worked like a charm.  Tight enough, but with enough space to reach and move.

Classic Brooks Sweater - The Fibonacci Pullover

Classic Brooks Sweater - The Fibonacci Pul</p> <p>As for the seemless bit, I loved it.  Grafting the armpits was so satisfying, and you can't even tell!  The only thing is, the gauge I knit was so tight that it made my hands a bit sore to knit on circulars.  If it wasn't for that, I might never knit flat again!</p> <p><a href=

As for the seemless bit, I loved it.  Grafting the armpits was so satisfying, and you can’t even tell!  The only thing is, the gauge I knit was so tight that it made my hands a bit sore to knit on circulars.  If it wasn’t for that, I might never knit flat again!

Classic Brooks Sweater - The Fibonacci Pullover

As per the pattern, I left the bottom hem band of the sweater until the end, for which I am glad.  I hadn’t really knitted up enough on the body before I started the arm pits, and thus that ability to add extra onto the bottom without the sweater looking cobbled together was much welcomed!  Plus, I have the option of adding more to the sweater if he decides that he would like it longer at some point, or the washing of it does something curious to the length.  I decreased about 10% of the stitches for the bottom band*.

Classic Brooks Sweater - The Fibonacci Pullover

So, there you have it, the Fibonacci Pullover

Yarn: Cascades Ecological Wool in the 8025 shade/colourway, just over three skeins.
Needles: 3.5 mm needles (a little bit small in my opinion, the sweater is rather stiff but we’ll see how it washes up)
Size: 44″ chest (cast on 184 stitches)

Merry Christmas my love!

Classic Brooks Sweater - The Fibonacci Pullover

* One issue with adding the bottom band, post torso, is that it seems to fold up on itself. I don’t know if this is because he is sitting in a wheelchair all the time, or if it is because there is a seam there and it needs to be blocked straight (hubster maintains that his body heat will block it, and there is no need to wait any longer) If you have an answer… send a signal!

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  1. Ali
    Ali01-11-2010

    I think I already told you how great this sweater looks, but I feel the need here to repeat myself: that is a SERIOUSLY cool sweater Lisa! I am very, very impressed. Also, I’m totally digging on Justin’s hair/facial hair in these pictures. What larks!

    <3

  2. Laura
    Laura01-26-2010

    What a great sweater! I don’t recognize the symbolism but I do love the cables!

  3. Nina
    Nina02-10-2011

    Wow! This is a great design! I love your blog, please post more often! Regarding the rolling of the bottom edge… Perhaps it’s rolling because you’re knitting one side and purling the other? Knit stitches are naturally shorter than purl stitches, making the fabric roll when you’ve got more than a couple rows… ? I usually knit both sides for a couple rows on the bottom edges to avoid this problem. I hope this suggestion isn’t ridiculous to you. You’re obviously a very experienced knitter so I don’t mean to offend in any way!

    :)

    http://enchantedlabyrinthofpixiethreads.blogspot.com

  4. Maven
    Maven03-20-2011

    Thanks for the suggestion Nina and I’m not offended! The way I look at it, if I’m not learning, then I am not getting any beter at what I do (the old “if you’re coasting you are going downhill”)
    Actually, I totally agree with your remedy, however the bottom is k1 p1… and I think it rolled because of where it is on jt’s belly, and because I picked up the stitches for the bottom ribbing, which means that they are really coming out the front at a slight angle.. If I was to do it again, I would knit the sweater a few inches longer longer with a hem at the bottom. It would look a lot cleaner and not roll up! But alas, there it is to stare at me until the sweater disintegrates…

    Thanks for the encouragement to write more often… I will.

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